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Keeping you updated with the latest news
 

2022

1 March 2022
Song for Ukraine
21 February 2022
#22for22 Update
7 February 2022
The Armed Man

2021

16 December 2021
#22for22 is launched
4 December 2021
Christmas is Back! with a brassy bang!
6 November 2021
714 Days... Back in Concert
27 October 2021
660 Days... We're Back
4 October 2021
Annual General Meeting
1 August 2021
2021/22 Season Launched
7 June 2021
Expanding the Canon
18 May 2021
Live Singing started ... stopped
17 May 2021
Fridays and the Future
14 April 2021
Virtual Video
12 April 2021
Summer in the Alps
26 March 2021
Fridays at Four - Spring Done
9 March 2021
International Women's Day
22 February 2021
Cooking up a Feast
12 February 2021
Centenary Classics
11 January 2021
Classical Classics

2020

31 December 2020
Christmas Choral Alphabet
17 December 2020
Christmas Singing and Quiz
4 December 2020
Experts - Angel, Nun, and Priest
2 November 2020
Concerto for Ten
22 October 2020
Virtual AGM
14 September 2020
How can I keep from singing?
7 September 2020
An Angel, a Nun, and a Red Priest
29 August 2020
Choral Alphabet reaches 3000
27 July 2020
Virtual Quiz Time
1 July 2020
Our MD begins with RLSBC
8 June 2020
Howells in Lockdown
9 March 2020
Committee Changes
9 January 2020
New Appointment for our MD
6 January 2020
Choral Evensong in Oxford

2019

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2014

 

Forty for Gloria in Brum

This evening over forty choir members visited Birmingham’s Symphony Hall to hear the City of Birmingham Symphony Orchestra perform works by Berlioz, Tchaikovsky, Stravinsky, and Poulenc – for whose Gloria the orchestra were joined by members of the CBSO Chorus and the soprano soloist Sophie Bevan.

Poulenc with Berlioz, Tchaikovsky and Stravinsky
 
The CBSO Chorus - ready for Poulenc

The Poulenc is a great favourite of many choir members and we are hopeful that we will get the chance to perform it again soon (we last performed in in 2002); conductor Nicholas Collon kept the pace flowing throughout and ensured that the gaps between each movement were short and sweet. The acoustics in the Hall are so superb that we were able to hear every word of the Poulenc, and the large proportion of men in the choir ensured that there was a superb balance across all four parts.

One Half of the Assembled Choir
 
And the Other Half of the Assembled Choir

For many of our group it was the Tchaikovsky, however, which was a great revelation. Over nearly twenty minutes the brooding atmosphere was full apparent, and as each section moved on it became clear that it was not a work in traditional exposition-development-recapitulation form, but instead a very linear fantasy.